World Language News

Major funding increases for Francophone communities in the western Canadian territories of Yukon, the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut have been announced. For more than...

Last month, the presidents of the American Federation of Teachers and the Asociación de Maestros de Puerto Rico (the Puerto Rico Teachers Association) co-signed a letter to the Financial Oversight and Management Board for Puerto Rico, describing the harmful impact of the deep education cuts over the past decade and the devastating consequences additional proposed reductions would have on students and Puerto Rico’s future.

The Institute of International Education’s (IIE) Mark Lazar reports on how U.S. campuses are responding to the needs and concerns of current and prospective students from the Middle East, North Africa, and beyond. To help campus leaders and admissions officers navigate these uncertain times, IIE’s Mark Lazar and a team of experts has put together a list of ten actions to encourage international students to come to the U.S. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, but it offers a platform from which to rebuild the confidence of concerned international students.

Despite Brexit–or maybe because of it–there is a desperate shortage of world language teachers in the UK, so the government is launching a program to train native speakers of French, German, and Spanish to become teachers. The plan is to create opportunities for people with linguistic skills, whether they are living in the UK or elsewhere in Europe. “There may be people who speak French, German, or Spanish – in the UK or abroad – who would like to consider a career change and go into teaching,” said Gaynor Jones, director of the National Modern Languages SCITT (School Centred Initial Teacher Training). “For some, it could be an opportunity to experience a different culture as well as using their talents for the benefit of students keen to learn a new language.

Literacy

As K–12 districts aim to improve learning for a wide range of students facing unique challenges, education leaders need to be particularly mindful of the English language learning (ELL) student population. Of all the students in public schools in the U.S., an estimated 9.3% were ELLs in the 2013–14 school year. Though ELL students have made strides in reading, leaping 22 points in average fourth-grade reading scores from 2000 to 2015, this group of students is consistently behind their non-ELL peers in this area.

Resources

Fluency Matters offers a wide range of compelling leveled readers specifically designed to facilitate language acquisition with novice to intermediate level students. All readers...

ATi Studios has released a virtual reality app for language education to combine the artificial-intelligence technology behind chatbots with speech recognition in virtual reality....

Drawp for School is a digital content-creation and collaboration tool with embedded language scaffolds for English language learners (ELLs). Teachers use Drawp to provide...

Professional Development

M. Elhess, E. Elturki, and J. Egbert offer strategies to support creativity in the language classroom “Our students aren’t creative,” claimed one of the language teachers in the...