Tag: language learning

UT Austin Statisticians Win Prestigious Award for Language Learning Research

UT Austin statisticians Giorgio Paulon and Abhra Sarkar have been awarded the prestigious Mitchell Prize for their paper on tone learning in adults. The Mitchell Prize, jointly sponsored by the American Statistical Association, the International Society for Bayesian Analysis, and the Mitchell Prize Founders’ Committee, is awarded annually to the author(s) of an outstanding paper that utilizes Bayesian analysis to...

Infants Capable of Complex Language Processing

A new study published in Cognition suggests that infants may have more advanced linguistic understanding than previously believed. Conducted by a team of researchers at the University of Edinburgh and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the study looks at how children aged 11-12 months old processed multi-word sequences—phrases like “clap your hands,” for instance. The results showed that children...

Rumi in the Language Classroom Vol 5: The Pain of Professional Development

Rumi in the Language Classroom Series Vol 5 See Vol 1 hereSee Vol 2 hereSee Vol 3 hereSee Vol 4 here In the fifth part of “Rumi in the Language Classroom”, we will explore one of the Rumi's stories in the collection “Masnavi-e-Manavi” called The Lion Without Head and Tail. This is the story of a champion who wanted to tattoo...

Applying Task-Based Learning to Extended Reality

Once technology enters the classroom, it rarely leaves. These days, as online learning emerges as the next technology to find a home inside the classroom, we have an opportunity to look further into the future. This is a great time to consider the next digital horizon for education—specifically the emerging fields of augmented reality and virtual reality. Both technologies...

Homeschooling 101: Tips for Parents Adjusting Virtual Learning With Kids

For the past decade, I have seen firsthand how students may benefit from certain elements of online education that help ensure a more effective learning environment. But, as my children’s schools closed in the wake of coronavirus, even I have struggled at times to make the transition to working mom and teacher of three teenagers who are now going...

AERA and OECD to Co-Host Webinar on Education Research Worldwide

The American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) will co-host a webinar on “Education Research Worldwide in a Covid and Post-Covid World” at 9:30-11:00 am EDT Wednesday, September 23.  This AERA-OECD webinar will examine priorities and planning for education research at a time when education and learning face uncertainty and dislocation. In this...

Post COVID-19 Advocacy

This spring, our personal and professional lives were complicated by the unknown. We learned about flexibility and new routines. Some of us still feel overwhelmed. In spite of these realities, it is time to think about strategies for post-pandemic advocacy for languages and language programs. When the pandemic fades, priorities will be transformed. With students falling behind in the...

Stephen Krashen’s Seven Tips for Teaching Language During Covid-19

For Stephen Krashen, the disruption to traditional education during Covid-19 may reveal some unexpected benefits. Krashen is a leading world scholar, emeritus professor of Education at the University of Southern California, and author of several books on language acquisition.  In a recent conversation, Krashen discussed how teachers and parents can harness the opportunity to teach language—including heritage languages—during remote learning. Here...

The Art of Teaching

“Our students aren’t creative,” claimed one of the language teachers in the professional development workshop. The other participating teachers nodded in agreement. “How do you know?” asked the workshop facilitator. The teacher hesitated. “Well,” she said, “I guess I don’t. We don’t ask them to do anything creative, mostly because we teachers are not creative either.” The teacher in this real-life...

Babies Can Link Language and Ethnicity

A recent study from Canada’s University of British Columbia (UBC) suggests that eleven-month-old infants can learn to associate the language they hear with ethnicity. The research, published by Developmental Psychobiology, found that 11-month-old infants looked more at the faces of people of Asian descent compared to those of Caucasian descent when hearing Cantonese but not when hearing Spanish. "Our findings suggest that by 11...
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